MODEL DAILY LESSON PLAN

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MODEL DAILY LESSON PLAN

 

 

School: _____________________________ Instructor: ___________________

 

Address: ____________________________ Office Phone: _________________

 

 

Course Number

 

Course Name

LESSON PLAN FOR CONTENT GOAL:

Name of Content Goal (from course syllabus)

 

INSTRUCTIONAL TOPIC:

— active orientated main topic

— establishes where the learner is going

 

PREREQUISITES(S):

— prerequisite needed to be met by student before attending

this lesson

 

INTEREST APPROACH (time: ___ minutes):

— captures the learner’s interest and attention

— difference between good and excellent instruction

— answers question: “Why is it important that we (insert the

content goal statement)?

 

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVE:

— addresses where the learners are going and how the learners

will know they are there

— extracted from the syllabus

 

PREASSESSMENT PREREQUISITE PRE-TEST (time: ___ minutes):

— are the prerequisites met?

 

STARTING POINT PRE-TEST (time: ___ minutes):

— where are the students now? (not always required)

 

EXEMPTION TEST (time: ___ minutes):

— can student skip this lesson because of knowledge possessed

now? (not always required)

 

LEARNING EXPERIENCES (make sure all instruction time is on task):

SUBGOAL TOPIC: (subgoal for the content goal)

DOMAIN: 1 of 3 choices   LEVEL: 1 of 3 choices

THEORY OF LEARNING: 1 of 5 choices

METHOD OF DELIVERY: 1 of 4 choices (time: ___ minutes)

INSTRUCTOR PRACTICES: 1 or more of several choices

  1. first instructor practice after edit
  2. second instructor practice after edit
  3. and more, if needed

ASSIGNMENTS: 1 of several choices (time: ___ minutes)

 

SUBGOAL TOPIC: (additional if desired)

 

POST-TEST (time: ___ minutes):

— choose from a list of options for type of test you want to

give

— lets you choose how many of each type of questions to ask

 

REFERENCES AND RESOURCES:

— identify any reference, special equipment, or supplies

needed

 

NOTES:

— any information you wish to save regarding the general

administration of the lesson plan (optional)

 

DATE:

— enter the date on which you developed, revised or want to

deliver the lesson (optional)

 

DAILY LESSON PLAN
INSTRUCTOR DATE
COURSE TITLE LESSON NUMBER
UNIT SPECIFIC TOPIC
INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL (outcome that students should be able to demonstrate upon completion of the entire unit)
PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVE (use an action verb in a description of a measurable outcome)
RATIONALE (brief justification — why you feel the students need to learn this topic)
LESSON CONTENT (what is to be taught)
INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES

a.     Focusing event (something to get the students’ attention)

b.     Teaching procedures (methods you will use)

c.      Formative check (progress checks throughout the lesson)

d.     Student Participation (how you will get the students to
participate)

e.     Closure (how you will end the lesson)

EVALUATION PROCEDURES (how you will measure outcomes to determine if the material has been learned)
MATERIALS AND AIDS (what you will need in order to teach this lesson)
DAILY LESSON PLAN

 

DATE LESSON NO. UNIT
COURSE TOPIC
INSTRUCTOR
SUBJECT OF LESSON
INSTRUCTIONAL AIDS, MATERIALS, OR TOOLS NEEDED
REFERENCES
LESSON OUTLINE
ASSIGNMENT
NOTES
LESSON PLANNING PROCEDURES
Time — we only have so much of it. The effective teacher cannot create a single extra second of the day — any more than anyone can. But the effective teacher certainly controls the way time is used. Effective teachers systematically and carefully plan for productive use of instructional time.

One of the primary roles that you will perform as a teacher is that of designer and implementor of instruction. Teachers at every level prepare plans that aid in the organization and delivery of their daily lessons. These plans vary widely in the style and degree of specificity. Some instructors prefer to construct elaborate detailed and impeccably typed outlines; others rely on the briefest of notes handwritten on scratch pads or on the backs of discarded envelopes. Regardless of the format, all teachers need to make wise decisions about the strategies and methods they will employ to help students move systematically toward learner goals.

Teachers need more than a vague, or even a precise, notion of educational goals and objectives to be able to sequence these objectives or to be proficient in the skills and knowledge of a particular discipline. The effective teacher also needs to develop a plan to provide direction toward the attainment of the selected objectives. The more organized a teacher is, the more effective the teaching, and thus the learning, is. Writing daily lesson plans is a large part of being organized.

Several lesson plan outlines will be presented. You as a teacher will probably begin by choosing a desirable outline and sticking fairly close to it. Planning and classroom delivery innovations usually come once you are in the classroom with your own set of learners, have developed your own instructional resources, and have experimented with various strategies. Although fundamental lesson planning elements tend to remain unchanged, their basic formula is always modified to suit the individual teacher’s lesson preparation or style of presentation.

The lesson plan is a dreaded part of instruction that most teachers detest. It nevertheless provides a guide for managing the learning environment and is essential if a substitute teacher is to be effective and efficient. Three stages of lesson planning follow:

Stage 1: Pre-Lesson Preparation

  1. Goals
  2. Content
  3. Student entry level

Stage 2: Lesson Planning and Implementation

  1. Unit title
  2. Instructional goals
  3. Objectives
  4. Rationale
  5. Content
  6. Instructional procedures
  7. Evaluation procedures
  8. Materials

Stage 3: Post-Lesson Activities

  1. Lesson evaluation and revision

Lesson planning involves much more than making arbitrary decisions about “what I’m going to teach today.” Many activities precede the process of designing and implementing a lesson plan. Similarly, the job of systematic lesson planning is not complete until after the instructor has assessed both the learner’s attainment of the anticipated outcomes and effectiveness of the lesson in leading learners to these outcomes.

One final word. Even teachers who develop highly structured and detailed plans rarely adhere to them in lock-step fashion. Such rigidity would probably hinder, rather than help, the teaching-learning process. The elements of your lesson plan should be thought of as guiding principles to be applied as aids, but not blueprints, to systematic instruction. Precise preparation must allow for flexible delivery. During actual classroom interaction, the instructor needs to make adaptations and to add artistry to each lesson plan and classroom delivery.

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